Interview: Harrison Anderson, Musician/Photographer

Interview: Harrison Anderson, Musician/Photographer

In recent months I’ve become fascinated by the routines and day-to-day practices of creative people, in an effort to understand how they actually get things done. Hence, a series of interviews where creators talk about how they accomplish anything at all in this busy life.

Watching Harrison Anderson grow as both a musician and artist has been an honor. [Full disclosure, I met Harrison at a dinner party that I barely remember when I was 19 years old-- in the five years since then, we've played music together for almost 3 years in several different bands.] Not only has he swiftly become one of Austin's most thoughtful bass players, but he's also an emotional and generous photographer. As time wears on, Harrison continually impresses me, not only with his positive attitude and genuine excitement for making things, but also his remarkable ability to quietly persevere and do the work.   

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Interview: Libby Webster, Writer

Interview: Libby Webster, Writer

In recent months I’ve become fascinated by the routines and day-to-day practices of creative people, in an effort to understand how they actually get things done. Hence, a series of interviews where creators talk about how they accomplish anything at all in this busy life.

In the few years since she moved to Austin, transplant Libby Webster has quietly risen to the forefront of the Austin music scene as a music writer and critic via The Austin Chronicle. Her thoughtful, impactful writing --specifically her incredible article on sexism in music which you can read here-- hits home without ever hitting you over the head. Not only has she written about and interviewed artists such as Mitski and Courtney Barnett, she also works for the reputable label family Secretly Group, which represents musicians ranging from Yoko Ono to Whitney.  Her determination and ability to push herself beyond self doubt is a reminder to just keep on keepin' on, or as she says below, "The only way out is through!" 

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Interview: Ellen Bruxvoort, Fiber Artist

Interview: Ellen Bruxvoort, Fiber Artist

In recent months I’ve become fascinated by the routines and day-to-day practices of creative people, in an effort to understand how they actually get things done. Hence, a new series of interviews where creators talk about how they accomplish anything at all in this busy life.  

A self-taught weaver, Austin, TX based fiber artist Ellen Bruxvoort began making wall hangings in 2014, and immediately fell in love with fiber art. Since then, she's gained a devoted online following not only for her work but also for her personable and engaging writing about both weaving and her life. Additionally she's studied textiles and fiber arts in Peru, and taught online weaving classes for Skillshare.com. Her tenacity to simply "keep showing up" is both remarkable and motivating. 

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Pad Kee Mao

I love new beginnings & fresh starts more than pretty much anything. I think of many of mine-- the first time I wore black, the first time I smoked a cigarette, New Year's Eve 2014-- all of which were really indicators of other things that were going on that had very little to do with what color I was wearing, and much more to do with my own awareness of what those things meant to me in the narrative of my life.

I keep thinking about the upcoming solar eclipse.  I don't really care about seeing the eclipse, but I like the idea of it, because I can't help but feel that afterwards, things will be different in the best way. 

This summer felt different, less carefree maybe? I haven't installed floating shelves or gone to the pool as much as I thought I would. I did however, uncover a deep love for Pad Kee Mao, a spicy Thai noodle dish that pretty much sates every craving I've ever had. I like this dish most from a restaurant called Thai Kitchen, where occasionally the cook will add so many Thai chilies that I cry a little bit-- which is how I like it the most. Point being, I've started to make this at home because I crave it so much.

It's that good. 

 

Pad Kee Mao

from The New York Times

 

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 tablespoons fish sauce
  • 2 tablespoons dark sweet soy sauce 
  • 1 teaspoon rice vinegar
  • 6 cloves garlic
  • 5 bird’s eye chiles
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • ½ cup sliced onion
  • 1 pound ground pork
  • ½ cup sliced bell peppers
  • 12 ounces fresh rice noodles
  • 2 handfuls of holy basil leaves (or Thai basil, in a pinch)

PREPARATION

  1. Whisk together the fish sauce, soy sauce and vinegar, and set aside. Roughly chop the garlic and 3 of the chilies together. Smash the other two chilies with the flat of a knife, and set aside.
  2. Put a wok (or a large frying pan) over medium-high heat; when it’s hot, add the oil, the garlic-and-chile mixture and the onion. Cook, stirring constantly, until the garlic is fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the pork and a splash of the sauce. Cook, stirring to break up the meat, until the pork is cooked through, about 5 minutes.
  3. Add the peppers and noodles. Turn the heat to high, and add almost all of the sauce (save a spoonful or two to add later if needed). Cook, tossing everything together and separating the noodles if necessary, until the noodles are coated in sauce and take on a slightly charred flavor from the wok. Taste, and add more sauce if needed. Toss in the basil and the smashed chiles, and serve immediately.